The Banned / A New Name

Everyone’s getting banned. Aung San Suu Kyi is banned from leaving her house arrest in Burma. Ousted Honduran president Manuel Zelaya is banned from leaving the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa. And now I’ve been banned from using the computer on Sundays. I proudly stand with my fellow bannees. But Sunday is past. So I can now mention a couple of things.

  1. Worrying/odd treatment of the British National Party (BNP) by BBC Radio 1’s Newsbeat show. See Guardian newspaper news story and Roy Greenslade comment.
  2. Something delightful I saw on the Cultural Snow blog.
  3. I’ve changed the name of the main character in my novel, Blackwatertown, to (ta dah) Macken. Or more fully. John Oliver Macken, aka Jack Macken, aka Jolly Macken. There now. Isn’t that a heroic moniker?

Macken’s previous name was too close to living people, who might themselves be displeased, or might themselves incur the displeasure of others incapable of differentiating fact from fiction. Bad for the health and all that.

Macken is a conflicted Catholic policeman serving in the RUC in the 1950s. After farcical encounters in the foothills of the Mourne Mountains of County Down, he is demoted from sergeant and banished to sleepy Blackwatertown near the Irish border. His arrival has far-reaching consequences: It wakes the place up; stirs up the murkiness round the mysterious death of the police officer he is replacing; sparks a new border war; and begins a sometimes dark, sometimes funny, wild ride through the politics of sexuality, sectarianism, loyalty and what it means to belong.

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4 Comments

Filed under media, Music, My Writing, politics

4 responses to “The Banned / A New Name

  1. Banned on a Sunday? Is this a religious thing? If you can’t Google it, just ask God.

  2. blackwatertown

    What’s worse, I was made to go for a walk. Outside. For miles. In the rain.

  3. Chen

    Liked the name so i looked it up…apparently Mackin” is the spelling of the name in County Monaghan, ‘where it is chiefly found, while Macken is found in County Louth’
    Hhhmm…maybe that adds an extra small layer to the inside-outsider dilemmas the character may have, and others have with him?

    Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Mackin#ixzz0qY56nkXN

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